>>Allergic Contact Dermatitis

Allergic Contact Dermatitis

An Allergic Reaction Triggered By Contact

What is Allergic Contact Dermatitis?

Allergic Contact Dermatitis is an inflammation caused by an allergy to a substance (allergen/hapten) with which the skin comes into contact.

It is a lot less common than irritant dermatitis.

It produces a reaction in the area where the skin comes into contact with the allergen and can spread to the surrounding area.

Causes

There are numerous allergens:

1) Preservatives

  • Isothiazolinones in cosmetics, wall paint, toilet paper;
  • Parabens in cosmetics, medicines in solution form, syrups;
  • Formaldehyde in paper, disinfectants, household detergents;
  • Topical medications, cosmetics, rubber, stain removers, agricultural products, varnishes, paints, ink, fabrics, dyes, plastics, adhesives, leather, photographs.

2) Dispersed colorants (yellow, blue and red): in synthetic and non-synthetic fabrics.

3) Fragrances: in cosmetics, cleansers, toothpastes, washing powders and fragranced substances.

4) Metals

  • Nickel in jewellery, metal clothing accessories, bracelets, buckles, artificial limbs, scissors, watches, coins, keys, etc.;
  • Cobalt in metal accessories, cement, porcelain, paint;
  • Chrome (potassium dichromate) in metal accessories, shoes, leather, hides, cement, safety matches, metal alloys, paint.

5) Others:

  • Paraphenylenediamine in hair dyes, fuels;
  • Ethylenediamine in fungicides, insecticides;
  • Lanolin in cosmetics, inks;
  • Thiurams in rubber products, pesticides; 
  • Mercaptobenzothiazole in adhesives, cement;
  • Benzocaine in anaesthetic drugs, antihemorrhoidals, sunscreens;
  • Neomycin sulfate in antibiotic preparations for topical use;
  • Resins in adhesives, glues, paints, enamels;
  • Colophony in plasters, depilatory wax, paints, cosmetics;
  • Paraphenylenediamine in hair dyes, fuels;
  • Ethylenediamine in fungicides, insecticides;
  • Lanolin in cosmetics, inks;
  • Thiurams in rubber products, pesticides; 
  • Mercaptobenzothiazole in adhesives, cement;
  • Benzocaine in anaesthetic drugs, antihemorrhoidals, sunscreens;
  • Neomycin sulfate in antibiotic preparations for topical use;
  • Resins in adhesives, glues, paints, enamels;
  • Colophony in plasters, depilatory wax, paints, cosmetics.
Symptoms

Itching, rash, swelling, blisters, peeling, skin thickening, rhagades.

Affected areas

Where the skin has come into contact with the allergen that caused the reaction. Unlike ICD, it can spread to the surrounding areas.

Treatment

Identify and eliminate the cause that triggered the reaction (PATCH TEST); reduce inflammation, without resorting to cortisone if possible by applying soothing products which do not contain potential allergens; rebuild the skin barrier by using emollient and cleansing products that are free of fragrances, metals and other allergens.

Avoid

Applying substances that contain allergens that caused the ACD (metals, fragrances, preservatives, colorants).

Share
FROM RESEARCH TO INNOVATION
F.A.Q.